Setting Up a Profitable Seasonal Business on Your Farm: 5 Ways To Do So

Have you considered a seasonal business on your homestead? Consider the tips mentioned here to start making an additional income from your homestead.

A homesteading lifestyle might be something you have been dreaming about for a long time before you made your move, but you might be missing the buzz and meeting people. Maybe you could add a seasonal business to your income stream, and share your experiences with visitors from all over the place. There are plenty of ways you can make money out of your land, without compromising your values and lifestyle. Find five ways to set up a seasonal business on your farm below.

seasonal business

Five Ways To Set Up a Seasonal Business on Your Farm

Corn Maze

To attract local families to visit your farm and learn about the animals and your chosen lifestyle, you can set up a corn maze. It will grow in just a few months and attract people who are looking for affordable entertainment and getting close to nature. There are several great guides on how to create a corn maze and maintain it as a seasonal business. You can even make it challenging for adults and still suitable for kids.  

seasonal business

Farmers’ Markets

You might also want to team up with local farmers and offer them your space to sell their homemade produce and fresh fruit and vegetables. You do not have to be open all day. Simply choose a Saturday or Sunday every month when you invite and connect local buyers and sellers. You can host the farmers’ market and generate some income on either entrance tickets or stall fees.

If you do not want the responsibility of hosting a farmers market, then simply join an already established farmers market in your local area and learn how to make some great money on the sale of your fruits and vegetables.

seasonal busines

Antique Shows

In case you are homesteading in an area that is popular among antique dealers, you could set up an outbuilding to allow them to store the items they would like to sell during the regular shows. You can make easy money off your barn conversion, if you can offer advanced security and safe storage facilities. You can make your farm well known and popular in the area if you can team up with local dealers and attract buyers.

seasonal business

Play Barn

You might also create a family attraction by setting up a play barn. There are some great economic designs available at 4barnyard.com to fit into your environment. Kids will love the new type of play area. And parents will be happy to pay a few dollars to keep them happy and let them release their energy. Get some hay bales stacked up, and make sure that health and safety regulations are followed.

seasonal business

Petting Farm

Kids love farm animals, and you can accommodate their interest and hunger for information if you can create a petting farm enclosure. Charge a family admission fee. Start selling animal food, so kids can walk around and feed the different animals while having fun. You do not have to be open all year and every day of the week; focus on the weekends when families are more likely to go out for day trips. A petting farm is a great seasonal business.

seasonal business

If you would like to generate an extra income from your land, you have plenty of opportunities to choose from. You don’t have to devote too much time to planning and building. The above seasonal business ideas are great for busy homesteaders who want to meet new people and create awareness of their lifestyle in the local community.

Do you have suggestions and ideas on how to set up a profitable seasonal business on your farm that we have not mentioned here? Please add them to the comment box below.

Have you considered a seasonal business on your homestead? Consider the tips mentioned here to start making an additional income from your homestead.

About the author

I'm a mama to four and grandma to six. Yankee born with a love of the south. I love old-fashioned ways with modern thinking. I'm a homesteader, gardener, blogger. I enjoy “from scratch” cooking, consider myself a crafty do-it-yourselfer, and animal rescuer.

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