How Self-Isolation Can Benefit Your Homestead

The current pandemic that is spreading through the world puts everyone at risk. But for homeowners, self-isolation from your homestead can put you in a better position to support your local community and the health services. For a lot of people, self-isolation makes it challenging to make ends meet, as many businesses are forced to shut down. Additionally, grocery shopping has become tricky as many households are stockpiling ahead of the crisis. 

 

However, you can turn your homestead lifestyle to the next level to provide for your family and the vulnerable members of your community during these hard times. Here’s how to do it: 

 

self-isolation

How Self-Isolation Can Benefit Your Homestead

 

 

You notice problems early

 

Self-isolation has a significant advantage for home maintenance. Because you spend more time at home, you’re most likely to see issues before it’s too late. A lot of pest control experts warn against a false sense of security that encourages a lot of homeowners to ignore alarming signs and call for pest removal support when the situation has already spread dramatically. However, as you get to run a tight household and manage your stocks closely during those times, you can notice early signs of pest disruption. In other words, being at home means you are in the best position to protect your property and resources. 

 

pest damage

 

You’re not worried about food shortage

 

In areas that are practicing self-isolation and self-quarantine, a lot of households struggle to find the food they need in their local grocery shops. While there is no shortage of food per se, the issue is that shops can’t restock their shelves as quickly as people buy. As a result, late buyers are left with barely anything to fill the pantry. But, your homestead life has already prepared you for that kind of thing. You can use your vegetable garden to grow your own food for the time being. This will dramatically reduce pressure on shops. Additionally, homesteads that keep animals can safely stay away from shops without fear of running out of supplies. 

 

vegetable gardens provide well during self-isolation

 

Living frugally is no problem for self-isolation

 

A lot of people are forced to stay at home with no possibility of working. As such, wages are reduced or non-existent in many households. It’s making it hard to look after your family. However, the homestead way of life has already taught you a lot of DIY work. As a result, you can reduce unnecessary expenses by applying your DIY skills to providing necessary repairs and maintaining the property. Even if you can keep your income through the pandemic crisis, chances are that you won’t be able to find an electrician or plumber willing to risk their health for now. Therefore, your frugal DIY know-how can make a huge difference in keeping everybody safe and comfortable. 

 

Man repairing a fence

 

You can support your neighbors

 

Finally, some of your neighbors may not be in a position to care for themselves. Older adults are most vulnerable, which means that many seniors self-isolate and can’t go food shopping. Your homegrown vegetables and resources can make a difference. You could pack a little hamper basket with a selection of produce from your harvest to help vulnerable members of the community.

 

vegetable baskets are good to share during self-isolation

 

Final thoughts on self-isolation

In conclusion, while the health pandemic is affecting everyone, there is no denying that people who have chosen a semi self-sufficient lifestyle on a homestead are better equipped to tackle the crisis. You can use your knowledge and resources to support your community by reducing pressure on shops and encouraging self-isolation. 

The current pandemic that is spreading through the world puts everyone at risk. But for homeowners, self-isolation from your homestead can put you in a better position to support your local community and the health services.

 

 

 

 

About the author

I'm a mama to four and grandma to six. Yankee born with a love of the south. I love old-fashioned ways with modern thinking. I'm a homesteader, gardener, blogger. I enjoy “from scratch” cooking, consider myself a crafty do-it-yourselfer, and animal rescuer.

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